Monday, October 11, 2004

insomniac session #1

I document here the fact that it is 2 AM and I am quite wide awake. Nothing is wrong. I am not worried about anything in particular. My brain is just busy. Thinking about:

work, kids, my moblog , my partner, the volcano, learning stuff (CNET courses) and just surfin the web.

This feels like a waste of time. To document this sleeplessness. But who knows perhaps this is a pattern and by noting it here I can understand why I am so energetic so late (or is that early?).

There I was flipping channels when I came across the local Public Access station (SCAN TV). It was showing the latest episode of Goddess Kring. I had never seen this before and since it was this women sitting in what was apparently her bathtub with her nose up in the camera it was rather curious. I watched with amazement as she rambled on about dozens of subjects from Johnny Cash to her relationships to singing goofy songs. It felt like she was simply there trying to fill up air time.

It didn't take long to determine that this was exactly what she was doing. Filling each second with noise. I am sure some of it made sense, but unfortunately I clearly missed that part. This "show" was the prompting to turn off the TV and find some better way to spend these wakeful hours.

I turned to this blog.

Suddenly, I realized that here I am just filling the time rambling on about life or something like it. Wait! That was what I was just watching and listening to. Wasn't it? Yes, I am behind a screen not in my tub. {fear of electrocution I suspect}. But none the less I ramble on. Babbling from one subject to the next. Randomly spilling my consciousness (let's hope) onto the "page". Think about the billions and billions and billions of bits of information that are placed into cyberspace, the air, space and the lot. Pretty darn amazing. Oh sorry, I ramble on.

Fortunately for you, you too can switch the channel or turn off the transmission at a whim. Good for you.

Good night, good morning and good day.

Monday, October 04, 2004

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yet another blog about Mount St. Helens volcano

Just like several million others here in the Pacific Northwest (USA), I am experiencing the amazing impacts and dare I say, entertainment of the St. Helens volcanic events.

For me however it means quite a bit more. I follow earthquakes (EQs). I have even attempted earthquake (EQ) prediction. {stop laughing} Eventually someone is going to understand enough to do that.

My partner, Arlene, follows volcanoes of all types. As you can guess, the St. Helens activities have us both excited and concerned.

We carefully track and compare the various seismic webicorders that display the many burps and tremblings. Looking for patterns that disclose what is coming. This is something many learned scientists are also attempting with little success. The typical pattern for an earthquake is a sharp jolt on the seismograph followed by a slowly descending vibration. Rather looks like a stingray. When a volcano trembles the pattern is quite different. Yes, volcanoes have earthquakes, but the tremor is different. This appears more like a speech pattern. The vibration builds either slowly or rapidly but not with a jolt. It can vibrate for a long period. The amplitude can be maintained at a near constant rate. In association with the volcano these patterns are associated with magma movement. According to the volcanologists, St Helens is experiencing both EQs and the tremors.

Yep, Arlene and I are really enjoying the entertainment that nature has offered up so recently.

I predict that we will have yet another steam event tonight and perhaps even an actual eruption (magma reaches the surface). At least that is what the patterns demonstrate. We shall see how well I read the patterns.

References:
Rich's EQ pages at http://richhand2.home.comcast.net/eqs.htm
Arlene's volcano page at http://ajart2.home.comcast.net/arlenevolcanoes.htm
Mount St. Helens volcano pages at
http://www.geophys.washington.edu/SEIS/PNSN/HELENS/